NAB partners with DeadlyScience to step up STEM equity for Indigenous learners

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NAB has launched a new partnership with DeadlyScience, an Indigenous charity organisation with the vision to create better opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People to study Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM).

Across a two-year partnership agreement, NAB will encourage the bank’s STEM qualified colleagues to take on skilled volunteering opportunities that will support DeadlyScience’s school programs.

As one of the largest technology employers in Australia, NAB employs more than 5,000 technology experts including data scientists, software engineers, cyber security specialists and AI experts.

NAB Chief Technology Officer Steve Day said it was critical NAB supported Indigenous students to develop the digital skills of the future and help boost Australia’s tech talent pool.

“For so many years, Australia has run into the same problem that has held us back in the tech industry, and that’s the need for a better pipeline of technology workers,” Mr Day said.

“Our partnership with DeadlyScience is important for two reasons. First, it will promote and encourage opportunities for Indigenous learners to pursue a career in STEM if they choose to. Secondly, as new industries develop and new technologies emerge, we will be able to step up with a pool of diverse and talented technology workers, crucial for Australia’s future workforce prosperity.”

What is DeadlyScience?

DeadlyScience was founded in 2018 by Corey Tutt, who was named Young Australian of the Year in 2020.

The organisation supports regional and remote Australian schools that are critically under resourced and lack the same learning experience as students in urban areas.

According to the Government’s 2020 Australia’s STEM Workforce Report, just 0.5% of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community has a university degree in STEM subjects compared to 5.2% among non-Indigenous Australians.

Mr Tutt said working with NAB will help to break down barriers for thousands of young Indigenous people.

“Since our creation in 2018, we’ve worked with over 800 schools and community organisations and we’re proud of how far we’ve come along the way, but there’s still a huge gap in STEM accessibility for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners,” Mr Tutt said.

“Our partnership with NAB will help us elevate our vision with more visibility, therefore increasing our reach and impact across the country. We’re excited to access so many of NAB’s data and technology professionals who are experts in their field and can help us create more STEM equity.”

DeadlyLearners program are virtual sessions that engage remote and rural schools with STEM experts who can share their expertise with young Indigenous students. The program aims to inspire, empower and educate Indigenous learners by learning  key ideas, meeting STEM professionals, asking questions and sharing knowledge.

The DeadlySTEM program sees Indigenous knowledge holders, scientists and education specialists conduct face to face learning sessions with primary and high school students.

For more information about DeadlyScience, visit their website here.

To read more about NAB’s support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, visit the website here.

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